February 5, 2023

Insurance Industry Has a ‘Moral Duty’ to Help Prevent COVID Vaccine Injury: Josh Stirling

Two years on from the rollout of the first COVID-19 vaccines, public health data have begun to show a disturbing trend in excess deaths that has insurance research analyst Josh Stirling sounding the alarm.

“The more [vaccine] doses on average you have in a region within the United States, the bigger increase in mortality that region has had in 2022, when compared to 2021,” Stirling told Jan Jekielek of Epoch TV’s “American Thought Leaders” in an episode of the program that aired on Jan. 24.

Stirling, who has extensively analyzed public health data from both the United Kingdom and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), added that the shocking trend appears to be shared by both nations.

“Using data from the United Kingdom’s Office of National Statistics … you see that, although the vaccinated appear to have had lower mortality in the year 2021 in general and aggregate across all ages, in 2022, generally, the vaccinated have had much higher mortality than the unvaccinated,” he noted.

The Data

The UK data, released last summer, were collected monthly over a period of 18 months starting in January 2021.

Those numbers indicated that, in 2022, across all ages, the vaccinated experienced a 26 percent higher mortality rate than those who remained unvaccinated.

“And under the age of 50, it’s a 49 percent higher mortality rate,” Stirling noted. “Those are really troubling numbers.”

However, another striking discovery was that those who had received just one dose of a COVID vaccine had a 145 percent higher mortality rate than those who were unvaccinated.

While puzzling at first glance, Stirling advised that the statistic was likely due to those individuals who had adverse reactions to their first dose of the vaccine and decided against receiving a second one.

Furthermore, he noted that if one were to apply the UK mortality rates to the United States, the result would be 600,000 excess deaths per year due to the vaccines.

And though he acknowledged that the excess mortality rates could have been influenced by other factors, such as extended lockdowns or “long COVID,” Stirling held that the most obvious explanation was also the most likely.

“As a data analyst … if we’re looking at the time series, you end up saying, ‘Well, gosh, the easiest way to explain this, and probably the most statistically likely way to explain it is, in fact, the change that occurred in 2021, when the vast majority of the world got vaccinated,’” he said.

Included among the analyst’s other notable findings was an upswing in the number of workers reporting a disability to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics since spring 2021, as well as significant increases in other health concerns that he observed in Germany’s public health data, such as cancer, immune deficiencies, female fertility problems, and eye-related issues.

A Moral Duty

On Dec. 7, 2022, Stirling presented his findings before the COVID Vaccine Efficacy and Safety Conference hosted by Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) in Washington.

The senator expressed concern over the information, noting that “just about everybody” knows someone who had a severe reaction to their first dose of the vaccine and decided not to get another.

“We see these safety signals,” he added, “and we all are asking, ‘Why are they being ignored?’ They shouldn’t be ignored, and we’ve got a lot of questions.”

Echoing that sentiment, Stirling told Jekielek that he felt called to action after analyzing the data and hearing the tragic stories of those who had been injured by the vaccines.

“Ultimately, the stories are heart-wrenching as a father, as a professional analyst who likes to read things and likes to look at numbers,” he said, adding that he was particularly struck by the story of 13-year-old Maddie de Garay, a girl who suffered a severe adverse reaction after her second dose of the Pfizer vaccine while enrolled in a clinical trial for children.

“They didn’t even code her as a serious adverse event,” Stirling noted. “And … I began to realize there was a lot to this—that, as a moral duty, as a humanitarian calling, I should try to use those [analytical] skills, which I learned on Wall Street, for a better and more noble purpose. And that’s why I’ve been trying to help.”

Holding that the overall insurance industry also has a responsibility to help, he added that one of the ways they could do so would be to join the coalition he is forming to help identify those at risk for adverse reactions to the vaccines.

“I’ve been on the phone for the past two weeks, with lots of important people in the insurance industry, because we’re founding an organization called the Insurance Collaboration to Save Lives,” he said. “I’ve been shocked and blessed by the amount of momentum that we’re starting to get.”

The organization, Stirling said, will use standard medical technology, like blood screenings, to detect key symptoms relating to myocarditis, blood clots, autoimmune diseases, and other known side effects of the vaccines to identify those at risk and prevent any catastrophic outcomes.

“We want to save a million lives,” he said, adding, “The only way to know for sure what’s going on with Americans’ health right now is to go out and test them.”

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